Skip to main content

About your Search

20130216
20130224
STATION
CSPAN2 8
CSPAN 6
SFGTV2 6
MSNBCW 5
MSNBC 4
FBC 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
KGO (ABC) 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
KBCW (CW) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
on whether the courts agree with them. but they actually are trying to establish religion in the present system is actually picking one religion over another, they are helping to make it so that these are the real religions and they are picking the winners and losers essentially. neil: you are not afraid that they are witches? you are going to go right down the food chain? >> it is a long shot. >> they have enough of the case to go back to the district courts to have the opportunity of the case being presented. if they can show that this wasn't done in a neutral way, that this was done and they are just preferring the catholics over the weekends, then we needo address that. >> i think that all religions need to be treated equally. especially where people are looking for a source of religion. stability. most people in a country were placed where we are the most incarcerated place in the world, they should have the opportunity to do so. remember, a terrorist was recruited to become a muslim terrorist imprisoned. and that is a huge problem. i think that our justice department needs to look
of religion is understood to be a completely private matter. in the statement by mendelssohn, in connection with france, he said to be a citizen in the streets but a jew at home, but that is not the message you get from the stable of kosher food in philadelphia. it is ok to be a jew in public, too. it is not a matter of expressing to the private. the spirit of freedom is perhaps unique to the united states in the world, but even here, even with that kind of sounding, and even with the words of the first amendment to express that, things have not always been so happy, and especially not always so happy for minorities in america. he was not then chief justice but the man who was going to become chief justice of the supreme court fought on the convention to exclude roman catholics. it was a big fight. he was defeated alternately, -- alternately, but that was an attempt, and it was not long after, and that was a time when catholics constituted less than 1% of the population of the united states and were no threat out all. as larger numbers of roman catholics came to these shores, especially fro
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
says this. there is no discussion of spiritualism, mysticism, religion in any context. the students simply perform the physical components of movement and breathing of mainstream yoga. is this a violation of separation of church and state, jeff >> i'm usually on the fence of these things. but i think i'll give an answer here. no. you know, yoga is yoga. yes, there are aspects of it that are informed by hinduism and various eastern religions. no. yoga is yoga and there's nothing religious. it's just making them healthier. and more fit. and, you know, you should not make a federal case out of it. >> the school said the kids can opt-out. those who do they actually kind of fall short i guess on their requirements. i'm not sure. but the group that's suing they actually say when you let the kids opt occupant they get bullied and then they are separated they can get picked on. it's a very big deal apparently yoga in this school district. >> jeff is too reasonable for me. he doesn't like to sue. he's a constitutional scholar. if he says no violation, novi allocation. but it's a problem if t
. but on other hand he's been a blessing. he reminds world reason always needs to be applied to religion and you can never take up the sword or the bomb in our modern world in the name of religion. both of those come from his scholarship. >> here in the bay area issues that we often associate with the catholic church and the catholics discuss gay marriage, women in the priesthood, child abuse by the clergy are sort of preeminent. do you think that is going to be reflected in this conclave or what are their priorities? >> certainly all those things. as i said, when they get together to talk about what are the pressing issues, all of those things are going to ob their minds. there's a clear direction forward for greater transparency, complete transparency in the church working with the state, with respect to sexual abuse in the church. for those other issues, those changes in the order, in social -- [indiscernible] -- church leadership is a spokesperson for the rest of the church. they listen for the sense of the faithful and they make no major changes
much that can be laid at the pope's feet? >> the purpose of a religion is to help people make sense of the big questions, the questions that none of us have answers to. why are we here, where are we going, why do we suffer, what happens after death. it's important a church or any religion engage with its people and meet them where they are. it's to help people find meaning. when a religion stops helping people find meaning people will turn to consumerism, to culture, and the pope is so busy declaring our culture, the culture of death, you know, putting the responsibility on us. >> you are laying this on the pope's feet. you're saying this person that comes out of cdf and the person who was the chief theologian is alienating the flock in the u.s. and europe where church membership as decline. >> he and the hierarchy of a. they have denied the crisis in the priesthood. >> i think it's doctrinal declarations are beautiful. they are out of time. it's precisely the crisis we haven't addressed. i was with some priests at dinner the other night teaching at a catholic university, living in
good crowd. they had a tensile store. here is the store that really blew my mind, true religion. my son wanted a pair of jeans. i said okay. i thought they would cause me a little less than $100. over $200. i was very shocked at how crowded the store was. he tried on four or five pairs of pants. he never tries any on. i am not sure what is going on. something has changed. remember late last year, true religion consider putting themselves up for sale. i think what it is, current management. this stock may be oversold here. they have one by on it. last year they were nothing but downgrades. earlier this year, insiders starting to nibble at the stock. extraordinarily conservative, in my opinion. they also upped their dividend. they opted to the fourth quarter of last year. showing signs of confidence. true religion, my son took me and he got me. i said from now on, the rest of my year, my man, nothing over $45. tracy: are you still thinking it is a by target pressure marks. charles: they announced to hire some advisors. it jumped 25%. again, my gut tells me these are the guys caught you kn
about religion and politics and how so many of the views that we believe, all of us, carefully reasoned and fought out, grounded in some deeper attitudes and deeper values and deeper life experiences, what i call world use that really shape or more specific beliefs, both in religion and in politics. so, not going to do too much of this, but i want to show you one of the charts. i don't try in this book to make an elaborate case where every single thing that i say, what i am trying to do is paint a broad landscape of what is wrong with in this country the walleye the population and congress's polarized and why that leads to congressional gridlock. let me do this first. this chart has been called the essentials chart for understanding, you know, the consequences that our budget conundrum are causing. what it shows is as of may 2011, this is done by the center for budget policy and priority based on cbo numbers. this shows the price of the annual deficit due to the board -- wars, the bush-era tax cuts to recovery measures. that means primarily the bush stimulus and the obama's stimulus pro
about religion and politics, and how so many of the views that we believe are carefully roped -- reasoned and thought out, are grounded in deeper attitudes, deeper values, deeper life experience-what i call world views, that really shape our more specific beliefs both in religion and in politics. so, i'm not going to do too much of this but i want to show you one of the charts. i don't try in this back to make an elaborate case for everything i say. i try paint a blood landscape why the population and congress is for alreadyized and why that it that leads to congressional gridlock. let me do this first. this chart has been called sort of the essential chart for understanding the consequences that our budget conundrum. it shows in may 2011 -- doesn't by the senate for budget policies and priorities based on cbo numbers. this shows the parts of the annual deficits that are due to the wars in iraq and afghanistan, and the bush era tax cuts, recovery measures -- that means primarily the bush stimulus and the obama stimulus programs -- t.a.r.p., fannie and freddie, and the economic
think or don't think about religion this politics and -- in politics and how so many of the views that we believe, all of us, are carefully reasoned and thought out are grounded in some deeper attitudes, some deeper values, some deeper life experiences, what i call world views that really shape our more specific beliefs both in religion and in politics. .. the essential chart for understanding the consequences of our budget conundrum. what it shows is as of may of 2011, the center for budget policy and policies and priorities, based on cbo numbers, this shows part of the annual deficits that are due to the war in iraq and afghanistan, the bush era tax cuts, recovery measures, that means primarily the bush stimulus and obama stimulus program and the economic downturn, you can still make it out and you can see from where we are today in 2013 at the time this was put together the single biggest factor in the annual deficits that we will experience over the next several years, not from the economic slowdown but because of the revenues that were taken away by the bush tax cuts. as we a
had been misused. history, like many religions, is multi vocal. that is, it is valuable. can be interpreted and deployed in ways that consciously, strategically or not simply suit the interests of the interpreter . so history can be useful. it can also be misused and even abused, but by scholars and practitioners. .. he had a sensationalist view of history. there was a novelty in the present moment. example includes the recent book "smuggler nation: how illicit trade made america." hijacking is a pretty sensational term to me. so how do peter andreas do it in this book? well, i think that he skillfully avoids in providing this present perspective. the other extreme that there is nothing new under the sun. i think this is most clear in the balance chapter, there is a subheading that is quite telling. so some things are new. for example, some of them do have greater global reach even if the extent of this reach has been exaggerated by the journalist and people of hollywood. it is indeed probably larger than it used to be historically. and there is also a relative share of illic
be applied to religion. >> here in the bay area, issues that we often are associated with the catholic church and the catholics discuss, gay marriage, women in the priesthood, child abuse by the clergy are sort of preimminent. do you think that will be reflected in the conclave? what are their priority in the. >> certainly all those things will be on their minds. there is a clear direction forward for greater transparency, complete transparency in the church and working with the states with respect to sexual abuse in the church. for the other issues, the changes in the order and social issues of the church, church leadership is the spokes person for the rest of the church. they listen to the faithful and make no major changes that they see in way would scandal them. >> it will be interesting. the catholic church is one of the oldest political institutions in the western world. >> and speaking of politics -- >>> the latest punchline on the colbert report in the state of california. >> obviously i don't trust the state completely because off bear on your flag! >> california's lieutenant g
launched an interfaith speakers bureau where we take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been
of that is that i am not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people elible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equa basis. i think that this debate
religions, actual religions and i think that, look, there's ways that people can take days off for their special days. i think though that you're going to be looked at funny if you insist you need halloween off. i think it's insulting if you're a wiccan or a pagans and if you're an atheist or a pagans, if you're celebrating nature, an everyday experience. >> tucker: only a country too rich too long could be this frivolous and silly. the statements from the school, the information about the wiccan and pagans holidays, the statement says, has been in the guide since last fall. keep in mind this is not intended just for faculty, this is an informational guide for anyone across campus. letting you know. >> letting you know which days you can take. >> tucker: and christianity and comes down to-- >> i think that there's a rejection of tradition. i think this is again, not about elevating anyone else, it's about paganses and wiccans used for a political agenda to downgrade what's important to a majority of americans. i think that this is an anti-tradition action. i think paganses and
appeals court said that prisoner that are part of the pagan religion can use a chaplain. catholics, muslims, jewish, profession -- protestants -- have chaplains. >>> u.s. security firm claims that it traced massive number of hacking attacks. hackers in that building have stolen hundreds of information from american corporations, organizations and government agencies. chinese leaders are denying the allegations. they say that china is also a victim of cyber attacks that have originated in the united states. >>> we all know the dangers of lasers pointed at pilots but did you also know that pointing a laser on people on the ground can be very dangerous and cause serious damage. that's happening more than you might think. david stevenson reports. >> reporter: thompson spends long hours in front of a monitor designing computer graphics. thompson and other passengers boarded a smaller sailboat for a sunset cruise. he says someone in an apartment building .25-mile away began hitting the boat with a laser. >> i felt like a sering -- searing like you get burned really quickly. >> it appar
] it was all very emotional. never mentioned. [inaudible] put me in jail or barred my religion. so it was hard for me to give up my citizenship. the land behind me. is it great to be an american? and don't know. >> we open the book with a vivid scene for 1968. just flown to reno nevada to get a quickie divorce in the days before no-fault divorce, very, very difficult to get a divorce back then. it had to be someone's fault, and it was not easy. she came back was in a bit of a state. she drove her car directly into the middle of downtown d.c. the morning after the night martin luther king was assassinated in this city, they just exploded. the 1960's in 1968 was a time of major turmoil and change in the that states, and it was also a huge time of change in your life because you get -- you did something that was difficult, you get a divorce after a very long marriage. it was the time when the women's movement was really beginning to get under way in the united states. i was impressed that you were not inspired by the women's movement. it was something else. [inaudible] >> said to a lot of reading
's the american riviera. >> i love it. great food, you can get married, find religion, and sometimes all in the same beautiful place. >> i want to die there. >> me too. ♪ >> santa barbara. where the mountains meet the ocean. the sun kisses the sky. and the only thing better than the fine wine is the five-star food. for tens of thousands of tourists every year, their first introduction to santa barbara happens aboard the landshark. part bus, part boat, the landshark starts on the street and ends up in the harbor. >> three, two, one! splash down! >> such a picturesque city, allows you to see everything from the land, to the water. check out the sea lions. back on land, santa barbara county features some of the most expensive properties in california, including the exclusive community of montecito, home to celebrities like oprah winfrey, ellen degeneres and rob lowe. >> the mission helping the poor remains the number one tourist draw in santa barbara. >> people do meet god here. >> father richard mcmanis is one of 14 brothers who have taken a vow of poverty, chastity, and obedience. to ca
. the officials say they are not teaching religion and called classes part of the physical fitness program and adds they no plans to get rids of the yoga classes. >> in royal news, is prince harry in love? sorry, ladies, he could be off the market. for now. he was spotted with the new flame at an exclusive ski resort in switzerland. they started day dating in may of last year but this is the first time they have been photographed together. "good morning america" will have much more on the lovebirds at 7:00 and the relationship they are working so hard to keep a secret. >> the white house is not a secret has released the first lady's new more -- portrait. it was taken in the white house friend room. you can compare with her previous official portrait with her much talked about new bangs this is start add trend and she referred to as being the mid-life crisis. but it works. she looks great no matter what. >> cheaper than a sports car. >> now the weather forecast. >> easier to maintain. >> a little hair spray and gel, all good. >> now, everyone, a little bit quieter, you can probably put appe
. >> reporter: and he repackages religion in a very unusual way. he's also a professional rapper, and preaches religion with rhyme. >> sometimes you have to do a little hip-hop, too. >> reporter: during a sermon? >> if need be. ♪ i'm trying to live it like christ ♪ >> reporter: as a rapper around the chicago area, the reverend is known as jay quest. >> what it really does is hopefully lead people into a greater understanding and awareness of themselves and their god. >> reporter: he's been preaching for ten years, he's been rapping professionally for about five years. they don't seem like they go together. but apparently they do. >> i don't think that i rap religion, though. i think that i rap about life, and i rap about the narratives of all of our experiences. i think that's the same thing that sermons are about. >> reporter: sermons and rap, the two have met. frank mathy, abc 7 news. >> whatever it takes. >> whatever gets the message out there is a good thing. so different people respond to different things. i like it. >> especially if you want to get to the younger demographic. that's
that was abandoned, and there's a lot of other religion, the left turned against religion. when it was half of the movement's inspiration and half of the dr. king's magnificent formula of equal souls, equal votes, a foot in the scriptures one foot in the constitution, and the next thing you know, people are turning against the spiritual base of democracy. we misrememberedded the civil war for a century. when i grew up in atlanta; the textbook said it had nothing to do with slavery. we got a lot of sentimental gone with the wind, and to this day, textbooks in history refer to the political movement that overthrew the reconstruction governments after the civil war and restored white supremacy in the south paving the way for segregation, referred, the textbooks refer to the movement as the redeemers. the redeemers redeemed the south. the religious word that in reality was accomplished by terror. terrorism as much as the terrorism that plaged the world that we're attuned to when it's not among us. it turned race -- race has the power of turning our sense of perception upside down. that's the te
of religion. first amendment fight that everybody at home, you've got to tune in it for it. listen to see how avery and richard see it. >>> also coming up, cops are baffled about the case of a young woman found dead in a hotel water tank. but it's not the first time bizarre and frightening things have occurred at the cecil hotel. it's got a very twisted history. >>> and we've all seen first lady michelle obama dancing with the president. right? have you ever seen her hit the dance floor like this before? not showing you yet. you have to tune in to see. >>> first, you're perhaps looking for a sun-splashed island to go to along with a dose of ancient history. greece has all of that. holly ferfer shows you how. >> reporter: greece really wants tourism dollars, and that's great for travelers. >> one of the great things about troovm greece right now, especially during the economic crisis, are hungry for travellers to visit the country. you can find a lot of great deals and discounts in greece right now. >> reporter: there are a few must-see stop ls. >> you definitely want to start in athens. that'
then that they get bitter king to guns or religion or antipathy towards people who aren't like them, or anti-immigrant sentiment or antitrade center. as with a toy to explain their frustrations. >> the comments became a big part of the discussion on the left-right culture war. republicans were happy to publicize his comments, but these days they're terrified they might be losing the culture wars on some front, and they may well will. let's look at the grounds on gay marriage. once unthinkable, nine states and the district of columbia have legalized same-sex marriage either by court degree, legislative action or actual popular vote. and now illinois, delaware, and hawaii are also considering legalizing gay marriage, same-sex marriage. and the rights retreat on cultural issues extends to other areas as well. i'm joined by lauren ashburn, found over the daily download and a contributor to the daily beast. oftenly confused with hillary rodham clinton. but not politically. let me talk about this, because you're on the front all the time fighting for same-sex rights and gay rights generally. isn't
in that because all so globalization and religion and economics coming together to complicate it. if you are talking about the divisions that cause people to start thinking like enemies, still very much with us. [applause] >> i want to thank taylor branch for being with us tonight. he will be signing books in the library. i want to thank the livingston foundation for sponsoring this lecture and it anybody in california is listening please -- we could really use it. thank you very much. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website taylor branch.com. >> to take booktv is in savannah, ga. for live coverage of the savannah book festival starting at 10:15 eastern with nobel prize winner and former vice president al gore on the future. 11:thirty-fourth and eighty psychologist heidi squire craft on rule number 2, lessons i've learned in a combat hospital. at 1:30 cnn's chief washington correspondent jake tamper on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. 2:45 presidential historian kevin thomas on ike's glove. at 4:00 pillage a prize-winning historian gerri willis asks why prie
curriculum. >> they are going to look closely and make sure that there aren't elements of religion in the program. >> to say it's watered down or been defanged of its religious tenets is simply in this case not true. >> the program funded by yoga nonprofit group is supported by most of the parents and the student. since starting the classes in january, students appear to be much calmer. but stay tuned. >> all right. >>> february is black history month and many schools are honoring it with special celebrations. but one bay area school honors the culture and the history all year round. and piedmont avenue elementary in oakland is this week's "cool school." >> you guys showing off, right? [ laughter ] >> okay. keep showing off. >> reporter: pope flyne has been teaching african dancing at piedmont elementary school for 26 years now. a popular musician in ghana, pope moved to the united states to teach. >> i would teach them the groove and then say you're on your own. >> reporter: twice a week students dance for an hour before school starts. >> w
by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. but it's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's what you were taught. i'm 24, and i know that's not the case anymore. but really, i mean, we always do that. we as humans are so fast to judge one another without really getting to know one another for what they are. so i definitely think it's something we could all take, take to and listen to. so anyways, we were stationed in northeastern afghanistan in a place called as jr. man, it's in the kunar province right on the pakistan border. and this is where i would be stationed with lieutenant john sovereign, gunnier is cent -- expubl and doc leighton. doc leighton was a navy corpsman, but they might as well be marines, so i'm going to cull him a -- call him a marine from here on out. [applause] so part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and getting to develop our team. becau
that in the industrialized world there is it a lot of people who don't stee the relevance of the religion and he wants to reenergize that faith. he started the uro faith . amms wrote a book evangelical of catholicism and calling for the church to deepen people's faith. janet? >> all right. thank you very much for the update. can you tell us about what comes next in the process? this pope had specific outreach, but what about the next one. you mentioned there may be interest in focusing on somebody to represent the different geoh, graphy. the process seems so secretive. >> i tomit give you ideas who may be in the top. it is important to understand the selection by what the church needs. if you go to the criteria and the church needs to reenergize. cardinal ravizi for culture. he's also the president of a different pontiffical commissions. he's leading the papal lenten retreat it is an honor to lead that retreat. two others had had . both went on to be the pope . cardinal schoola who is italian branch. they make up 25 percent of the cardinals and they center a big voting block . you can see cardinal ole
. the school said they are teaching fitness, not religion. the program that is funded by a grant started last month and the district said most parents believe it is helping reduce student stress. >> it happened just a couple minutes ago. a new bomb shell in the case of the blade runner charged with murder. why there is a new chief investigator. >> from the boat to the plate, somewhere along the line your seafood may be getting swapped for a lesser quality. we will tell you what a new study reveals. >> we he are live many san jose where there is a growing homeless tent city building at the san jose airport. we will tell you what the city plans to do about it and how much it's going to cost when we continue. t whatever you wan, baby. hmm. let's just share a 20 piece. [ internal ] 20 mcnuggets, for only $4.99? oh, man. she's beautiful smart and sensible. jackpot. [ crewperson ] anything else? [ male announcer ] mcdonald's crispy, juicy chicken mcnuggets are now part of the extra value menu. so you get the tastes you love at a price you'll love even more. guess who's going to the game? [ inter
study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. -- flora, fauna, philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among t
you go with -- >> as long as we're in the fantasy religion league, i won't with -- i went with soemtier. it would be to be a woman in america, that's not going to happen, but it does speak to some of the issues about how the church needs to open itself up and find herself, puerto rican, grew up in the bronx, has mixed it up in the real world and would be a good thing for whoever is pope. >> angela, who did you come up with? >> not yourself. >> absolutely not. but i think it's important to note there's 150 million catholics in africa and there is a quote that the pope said. he considers africa to be the spiritual lungs of humanity. to that end i seconded cardinal peter turkson who was recently appointed by the pope to head the pontifical council for justice and peace. he is a notable leader, and he is also from ghana. >> pope peter. >> yes, pope peter. >> that's got a nice ring to it, robert costa. >> the new millennium. i think that's a great pick. we'll hear a lot about third world choices, someone outside of italy, maybe outside of europe. if it's not going to be an amer
religious liberty. he wants to define the first amendment, free exercise of religion clause to one hour a week. that's what he wants to do. he is not our friend. >> stephanie: wow. >> that's treason. >> stephanie: i was going to say that sounded a little treasony. the president of the united states is our enemy? the enemy? that's dangerous talk, isn't it? maybe the secret service needs to borrow the giant cartoon paw. [knock at door] >> isn't that the sound the cat made when he was out for the night? >> stephanie: right. >> then the cat will stay out for the night. [knock at door] >> stephanie: that concludes right-wing world. thank god. [ applause ] >> you didn't like that? >> stephanie: no. >> started to turn. >> stephanie: 17 minutes after the hour. you know, we talk about carbonite. how great was that letter i just read the other day. an item t. specialist, someone lost everything in her computer. they called the data recovery company. it will cost $2,000. what could she have done? carbonite for only $59 for the entire year? now everybody in the office has carbonite. you have all of
. people in great distress either find religion or the courts. [laughter] that is okay. we need a road map. what we are really out lying is an ongoing mission. our ideal on both sides, because we are open to all and have a level playing field. the road maps, the clarity of language, and information flows to the ultimate consumers, it is ideal. i love the fact that at the beginning of the creation, there was the thought that information flow passivity in a certain way for a certain population. i love the fact there is one for seniors because information is channeled differently for different priorities in different times. it must reflect our diversity and the delivery of regulation. we are here for the seniors. i see so many coming to the court room see how important that is. >> i wanted to move on to discussing the short term. short-term credit ends up being a death trap for a lot of consumers in a harmful way. that brings us the issue of loans and we have seen the effects. i want to bring in dawn to the conversation. there you are. you have done a lot of work in texas around this issue. m
. >> we also had sister philip michael. she taught religion. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: okay. twenty-nine minutes after the hour. right back on the "stephanie miller show." ♪ alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ male announcer ] start with a groundbreaking car. good. then invent an entirely new way to buy one. no. no. no. yes! a website that works like a wedding registry. but for a car. first, you customize it. then let people sponsor the car's parts as gifts. dad sponsors the engine for your birthday. grandma sponsors the rims for graduation. the car gets funded. then you pick up your new dodge
, such as, for example, religion or os sa fied theorys that aren't based on what actually works but based on a religious ooh ooh ooh fervor. this is not the party of burke. i was teaching burke at columbia this week. my key question to the students is, you've read burke, conservatism. you thought you weren't going to like him. yet most of you hate republicans. what's the difference? >> wait a second -- >> i'm a great admirer of burke. i understand what you're talking about. i think part of the modern challenges of the movement in america was forged in the 1960s, before the great society. so there needs to be a reassessment of how you apply conservative principles to the 21st century. that philosophical is ongoing on. >> the author of the great director of mind. if he's watching, he's losing his mind because i think the whole persuasion of burke, burke is a radical calling your revolution. monar monarchist revolution. his whole point we liberals consider a have this argument, it was good conservatism back in the day. >> burke was in dialogue -- >> exactly, the ones who are no longer in pow
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)